Notes On: “The Tyranny of Merit” – Chapter One

“As the meritocracy intensifies, the striving so absorbs us that our indebtedness recedes from view. In this way, even a fair meritocracy, one without cheating or bribery or special privileges for the wealthy, induces a mistaken impression—that we have made it on our own” Thus is the delusion of the rugged individual. No one in … Continue reading Notes On: “The Tyranny of Merit” – Chapter One

Notes On: “Global Ethics: Seminal Essays” – Two

Here I conclude my looking at Charles R. Beitz’s “Cosmopolitan Ideas and National Sentiment” from Global Ethics: Seminal Essays. “Priority for compatriots might be supported by reasons pertaining to states that are themselves analogues of the reasons pertaining to persons which support the corresponding element of private morality. Or, priority for compatriots might be based … Continue reading Notes On: “Global Ethics: Seminal Essays” – Two

Notes On: “Global Ethics: Seminal Essays” – One

In a previous post I looked at the definition of cosmopolitanism, and so I now which gears in my “Notes On...” posts and look at a few topics on cosmopolitanism. As I have worked slowly through “The Origins of Totalitarianism” my thoughts began to shift toward what a world without nation-states would be like. Cosmopolitanism … Continue reading Notes On: “Global Ethics: Seminal Essays” – One

Notes On: “The Origins Of Totalitarianism” – Six

“God created neither men—whose origin clearly is procreation—nor peoples—who came into being as the result of human organization.”Excerpt FromThe Origins of TotalitarianismHannah Arendthttps://books.apple.com/us/book/the-origins-of-totalitarianism/id427715967This material may be protected by copyright. A person, in a natural state (I say understanding that this is a loaded statement), owes nothing but to ones self. A group of people only … Continue reading Notes On: “The Origins Of Totalitarianism” – Six

Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Five

“It was soon apparent that the mob from the four corners of the earth would not even have to do the digging; at any rate, the permanent attraction of South Africa, the permanent resource that tempted the adventurers to permanent settlement, was not the gold but this human raw material which promised a permanent emancipation … Continue reading Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Five

Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Four

“Outside all social restraint and hypocrisy, against the backdrop of native life, the gentleman and the criminal felt not only the closeness of men who share the same color of skin, but the impact of a world of infinite possibilities for crimes committed in the spirit of play, for the combination of horror and laughter, … Continue reading Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Four

Notes on: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Three

“This has been possible because the English gentry, from the seventeenth century on and in ever-increasing numbers, had assimilated the higher ranks of the bourgeoisie, so that sometimes even the common man could attain the position of a lord. By this process much of the ordinary caste arrogance of nobility was taken away and a … Continue reading Notes on: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Three

Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Two

“…might was changed into conquest and conquest acted as a kind of unique judgment on the natural qualities and human privileges of men and nations.”Excerpt FromThe Origins of TotalitarianismHannah Arendthttps://books.apple.com/us/book/the-origins-of-totalitarianism/id427715967This material may be protected by copyright. The principle of ‘might makes right’ can be clearly seen in the operation of modern, at least, American Capitalism. … Continue reading Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism” – Two

Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism”

“...every race is a separate, complete whole” was invented by men who needed ideological definitions of national unity as a substitute for political nationhood. It was a frustrated nationalism that led to Arndt’s statement that Germans—who apparently were the last to develop an organic unity—had the luck to be of pure, unmixed stock, a “genuine … Continue reading Notes On: “The Origins of Totalitarianism”